Upcoming event: “Obama’s second 100 days in office: Standing still or moving forward?”

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts administers the oath of office to President Barack Obama during the inaugural swearing-in ceremony at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2013. First Lady Michelle Obama, holding a Bible that belonged to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the Lincoln Bible, and daughters Malia and Sasha stand with the President. (Official White House Photo by Sonya N. Hebert)
Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts administers the oath of office to President Barack Obama during the inaugural swearing-in ceremony at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., Jan. 21, 2013. First Lady Michelle Obama, holding a Bible that belonged to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the Lincoln Bible, and daughters Malia and Sasha stand with the President. (Official White House Photo by Sonya N. Hebert)

Tuesday, 23 April 2013
12-14.00h

The whole nation watches the first 100 days of a president as the newly inaugurated POTUS establishes himself in the Oval Office and sets priorities and trends for his presidency.

During his first 100 days in office, President Obama hit the ground running with symbolic gestures (i.e. Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act, economic stimulus plan, closure of Guantanamo Bay). For his second 100 days in office he will be scrutinized on how he is performing on his campaign promises this time. What direction and priorities has Obama set for foreign policy? Can the aspired energy independence of the US be achieved and how will this affect the President’s foreign policy? What are Obama’s next steps in immigration reform? And will Obama be remembered as the President under whom the EU-US Free Trade Agreement was implemented and the transatlantic relationship strengthened?

Join the discussion with Richard T. Foltin, Director National and Legislative Affairs, AJC,  Daniel Mitov, Resident Representative, National Democratic Institute Brussels and  Hosuk Lee-Makiyama, Director, European Centre for International Political Economy (ECIPE).

For more information and to register, click here.