Interview: After Brexit – Snap Elections in Ireland 

 

On Saturday a new parliament will be elected in Ireland. For the Republic of Ireland, the stakes are high: In recent polls Sinn Fein, the former mouthpiece of the IRA, has risen sharply. In an interview with freiheit.org, Erin McGreehan, city councillor of Louth and a graduate of the European Women’s Academy, explains what the liberal Fianna Fail has to counter this and what the outcome of the election means for Ireland and Europe. Continue reading

Slovakia Before the Elections: A Chance for Change? 

 

The Liberals are looking to the next parliamentary elections in Slovakia with hope, but also with concern. A picture of the mood in the country.

The elections to the Slovak National Council, a unicameral parliament with 150 MPs, will take place on 29 February 2020. In addition to the established parties, numerous new political groups are competing for voters’ votes. The opposition has a clear goal: to replace the Social Democratic Party “Direction – Social Democracy” (Smer-SD), which is ruling in a tripartite coalition, after ten years of power. The Social Democrats lost the favor of voters especially in the past two years after numerous corruption scandals by their top politicians came to light. Despite the declared willingness to join forces, it seems that it is difficult for the opposition to find a common denominator. Continue reading

After the Elections is before the Elections 

Poland prepares for its presidential elections. The opposition still has to find itself.

 

During the marches for Independence Day, Poland’s re-elected national-conservative government distanced itself from the radical right-wing demonstrators and announced the composition of the new cabinet. The government is pressing ahead with its current agenda of restructuring the state. After all, after the election is before the election. And next year the presidential elections will take place. Continue reading

Gambled Away: Government Formation in Spain More Complicated Than Before 

Strong right-wing populists come in third – liberal party Ciudadanos crashes

 

Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez and his Social Democratic PSOE (“Partido Socialista Obrero Español” – Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party) have once again become the strongest force in Sunday’s parliamentary elections. Nevertheless, they have clearly missed their ultimate goal: to win votes in order to form a stable government. In fact, PSOE lost three mandates and now has 120 seats in Congress. The absolute majority requires 176 seats, but with the support of the left-wing populist party Unidos Podemos (“Together we can do it”) and the new Más País (“More Land”) the left-wing bloc only has 158 seats. For a progressive government majority, Sánchez would be dependent on the votes of various Catalan parties, which strive for the independence of the autonomous region and emerged strengthened from the 10N – it would be political harakiri. Continue reading

Spain Elects a New Parliament – Will There be a Government this Time? 

Spain elects a new parliament for the fourth time in four years on 10 November

 

Spain will elect a new parliament for the fourth time in four years on 10 November (“10N”), after the failure of a coalition between the Social Democratic PSOE and the left-wing populist Unidos Podemos party. The elections are influenced by the worsening crisis in Catalonia, which has been shaken by violent protests since the judgments against the leaders behind the illegal independence referendum of 2017. There could also be further riots in Barcelona on the coming election Sunday. The central government is therefore sending additional security forces to the region to ensure that the elections run as smoothly as possible. Continue reading

A Government that Stays 

The Law and Justice Party won the elections in Poland. The opposition is in crisis.

Most observers had expected it: The national-conservative government of the party Prawo i Sprawiedliwość (Law and Justice, or PiS for short) has been clearly confirmed in office. According to the latest projections, PiS’s share of the vote rose from 37.6 per cent in 2015 to 44.57 per cent. It owes this not only to its extremely rude but very skilful election campaign strategy, but above all to the weakness of the opposition. Continue reading

Poland Before the Election: It Remains Exciting 

 

On 13th October Poland expects an election of fate. The Prawo i Sprawiedliwość (Law and Justice) party, which has been in power since 2015, has since its election purposefully and skilfully put the country on a national-conservative course with authoritarian traits. It is performing well in polls – not least because of its generous social policy. The opposition still needs to develop some momentum in order to win the elections. Continue reading