New ELF Publication on European Citizenship Out Now!

 

Download the full publication on our Publications page.

 

Summary

From a European point of view, one of the most relevant citizens’ rights was the right to vote and to stand as a candidate in any EU country during the elections to the European Parliament. Approximately 427 million citizens from all over the European Union were invited to elect their European representatives from 23-26 May 2019. In doing so, they actively took part in the democratic life of the European Union. Among them were also EU citizens who voted in their country of residence rather than their native country, and EU citizens being eligible for vote on national lists in countries other than their own.

Whilst not the only concrete example of the application of citizenship rights, but arguably the most timely, European elections once again underline the rele­vance of such rights for citizens of the Union. Europeans are entitled to a number of rights, which go far beyond election cycles. The crucial question is, however, whether the opportunities of EU citizenship in other areas are only relevant to EU citizens who leave their country of origin. Or are they also important to the static population and therefore to all Europeans alike. This publication and its contributors argue for an inclusive understanding of European citizenship, applying to all Europeans regardless of their mobility status.

While the existence of EU citizenship is undisputed, we must ask ourselves: Do we really know what European citizenship is and do we make the best use of our rights? While in 2018 seven out of ten Europeans felt that they were citizens of the European Union, only a slight majority knew about their citizenship rights and one third would even have liked to know more. The knowledge is there, but not necessarily the competencies for its application. Referring back to the intro­ductory example, this years’ European elections – with a turnout of 50.66%, the highest in 25 years – are a beacon of hope in that regard.

“To be or not to be – EU Citizenship” aims to shed light on the rights of EU citizenship and to fill the gap between knowledge and application. It presents a number of concrete issues and perspectives around EU citizenship, which are of interest for liberal and non-liberal readers alike. Lying at the heart of the Euro­pean project, EU citizenship is far more than European identity and does not merely limit itself to free movement either. It is a legal status, enshrined in the European Treaties. EU citizenship has evolved over time and confers a set of civil, social, political and economic (fundamental) rights upon citizens of the EU. The concept of active citizenship is moreover a call to action to citizens of the EU to get involved and take on responsibilities.

This publication aims to introduce these rights and opportunities, present some practical examples of application and give recommendations on how to make even better use of our rights and advance active citizenship. At a time when the liberal international order and, with it, European politics, politicians and political parties are increasingly questioned or even under threat, an active European citizenry is more necessary than ever. Active citizens as members of a political community are vital for all levels of a functioning democracy. In the aftermath of the First World War, the German Liberal Friedrich Nau­mann created a new approach to democratic development with the establish­ment in 1918 of his school of citizenship (“Staatsbürgerschule”) in Berlin. He believed that for a fledging democratic system to succeed, we need citizens who understand the procedures, believe in democratic rules and become personally involved. Driven by the emerging contrast between the emperor’s subjects and the new self-assured and active democratic citizens at that time, today Naumann, among others, is still a source of inspiration for civic education.

More than 100 years later, the topic is far from being less relevant. The present publication is the end of a one-year journey on the topic of EU citizenship, aiming at highlighting the multi-faceted concept of citizenship and its rights for a non-le­gal audience. While the 2019 European elections were one undisputed highlight of that journey, Brexit was another major, if less pleasant event involving citizen­ship questions. Expected in 2019, it has not yet taken place at the time of writing. These examples highlight that we can predict the future only to a certain extent, but we can at least prepare ourselves by deepening our knowledge and acquiring the competencies to make the best use of citizenship rights.

 

Enjoy the read!

 

Carmen Descamps

European Affairs Manager

 

 

 

FAQ – Mentors & Team Coordinators

 

Please note, that the hackathon will be taking place according to Central European Time (CET).

 

When will the first hackathon take place ?

The hackathon will start on Friday, 19 June, in the late afternoon and will end on Saturday, 20 June 2020 in the early afternoon.

 

What is the agenda ?

You can find the agenda for the event here.

 

How is the online hackathon organised ?

The hackathon will include joint sessions and team sessions. For both session types, the main communication platform will be Zoom. Teams will deliver their pitches through the video presentation plattform Loom. There will be live-streamings, webinars, Q & A sessions and daily check-ins. For more information you will find the agenda here in due course.

Please preinstall both, Zoom and Loom software.

 

What are the challenges ?

Organisers have identified four challenges which are up for discussion during the online hackathon and for which new ideas and policy approches are developed. Each challenge will be tackled by a team of participants led by a team coordinator.

 

Challenge 1 :

What role and responsibilities for business ? What elements for a framework designed to support enterprises conributing to a prosperous Europe ?

 

Challenge 2 :

How to ensure that social market economy is closely linked to democracy, values, fundamental rights and freedoms ?

 

Challenge 3 :

What role for ECB and other European institutions and organisations in a refitted Economic and Monetary Union ?

 

Challenge 4 :

How to steer trade policy so that it mutually benefits eonomies and societies globally ?

 

What tasks for mentors ?

Each of the four challenges includes  one acknowledged, liberal minded expert in the relevant policy area, who acts as mentor. Mentors support the team with their expertise and experience during the process of developing new ideas and policy approaches for a social market economy in the 21st century.

Mentors hold a 10 minutes keynote at the beginning of the hackathon. Hence, they provide a thematic impulse to their respective team. Mentors follow their team’s discussion during the course of the hackathon. They actively engage and give feedback at specific times foreseen in the programme.

 

What tasks for team coordinators ?

Each of the four teams is led by a team coordinator, who serves as contact person to participants of his/her team. Team coordinators structure the debate and make sure that the discussion is goal oriented. They are responsible for time keeping. The Team coordinators may pitch the team’s ideas and policy approaches at the end of the hackathon. After the event, the coordinators produce  a policy brief, based on the team’s pitch.

 

How much time do I have to invest ?

The hackathon will start on Friday, 19 June, in the late afternoon and will end on Saturday, 20 June 2020 in the early afternoon. Whereas mentors’ obligations are scheduled on Friday (keynote) and Saturday (two scheduled feedback engagements with their teams), team coordinators are requested to fulfill their tasks throughout the entire hackathon as well as thereafter (delivery of paper).

FAQ – Participants

 

Please note, that the hackathon will be taking place according to Central European Time (CET).

 

What is the online hackathon « Engage Economy Europe21 ! » about ?

Mentioned in the EU Treaties, social market economy stands for an economic order, which combines free markets and social protection measures. This concept, that has many different dimensions across the EU and has been changing focus over time, is currently revisited in the light of digital transformation, the increased use of artificial intelligence, as well as challenges to the cohesion of the European Union through crises.

Understanding the scope and impact of big data and algorithms on citizens, enterprises and governments is crucial to rethink roles and responsibilities in our economic and social model. In addition, the current COVID-19 pandemic is acting as a catalyst for digitalisation across economies and societies. Digital solutions are in demand, therefore supporting the rapid development, adaptation and promotion of digital skills.

Past and current crises have intensified the debate on solidarity among member states and the social dimension of the EU. A re-balanced economic system with a pronounced social approach could become the glue that holds a diverse Union together in times of uncertainty. Formulating innovative ideas, bearing a liberal imprint, will therefore be necessary to strengthen cohesion and enable a stronger EU.

 

Who runs the « Engage Economy Europe21 ! » ?

The European Dialogue Programme of Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom is organising a series of three hackathons. For the first hackathon, FNF offices in Brussels and Prague team up, engaging partner organisations and individuals from eight countries across Central Europe and the Baltic States. Two other hackathons will be realised across Europe later this year.

 

When will the first hackathon take place ?

The hackathon will start on Friday, 19 June, in the late afternoon and will end on Saturday, 20 June 2020 in the early afternoon. The dates for consecutive hackathons will be communicated at a later stage.

 

What is the agenda ?

You can find the agenda for the event here.

 

How is the online hackathon organised ?

The hackathon will include joint sessions and team sessions. For both session types, the main communication platform will be Zoom. Teams will deliver their pitches through the video presentation plattform Loom. There will be live-streamings, webinars, Q & A sessions and daily check-ins. For more information you will find the agenda here in due course.

Please preinstall both, Zoom and Loom software.

 

In which language will the online hackathon be conducted ?

The language of the hackathon is English.

 

What are the challenges ?

Organisers have identified four challenges which are up for discussion during the online hackathon and for which new ideas and policy approches are developed. Each challenge will be tackled by a team of participants led by a team coordinator.

 

Challenge 1 :

What role and responsibilities for business ? What elements for a framework designed to support enterprises conributing to a prosperous Europe ?

 

Challenge 2 :

How to ensure that social market economy is closely linked to democracy, values, fundamental rights and freedoms ?

 

Challenge 3 :

What role for ECB and other European institutions and organisations in a refitted Economic and Monetary Union ?

 

Challenge 4 :

How to steer trade policy so that it mutually benefits eonomies and societies globally ?

 

Who are the stakeholders ?

The European Dialogue Programme of Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom has invited partner organisations and individuals from among their networks from across Europe.

 

What will happen with the outcomes after the hackathon ?

The organisers will publish all pitches on the website of the European Dialogue Programme. Following the implementation of all three hackathons, generated ideas and policy approaches will be brought to the attention of a wider audience – within liberal circles and beyond.

 

Recommended Readings

 

 

In the following you will find some interesting basic and more in-depth readings, in preparation of our first online hackathon « Engage Economy Europe21 », 19-20 June 2020.

 

World Economic Forum, White Paper: Policy Pathways for the New Economy Shaping Economic Policy in the Fourth Industrial Revolution, January 2019

 

World Economic Forum, Report: Policy Pathways for the New Economy Shaping Economic Policy in the Fourth Industrial Revolution, Platform for Shaping the Future of the New Economy and Society, November 2019

 

Mulder, Jotte, (Re) Conceptualising a Social Market Economy for the EU Internal Market, University of Utrecht, Utrecht Law Review, (15)2, pp.16-31, September 2019

 

Petropoulos, Georgios, Work Protection in the Digital Age : Towards a new social contract, Bruegel blog post, November 2019

 

Scott Marcus, J. and Porcaro, Guiseppe, Jobs and robots: Europe’s Debate Over the Destiny of the Welfare State, Bruegel blog post, September 2019

 

Bolid, D., Thematic Digest on EU Economic Governance during the pandemic, European Parliament, April 2020

 

Margaras, Vasilis, Demography on the European agenda Strategies for tackling demographic decline, EPRS | European Parliamentary Research Service, June 2020

 

KfW research, Focus on Economics, 70 years of social market economy: a cause for celebration, several occasions for reform, August 2019

 

European Parliament, Study: The ECB’s Mandate: Perspectives on General Economic Policies, compilation of papers, Monetary Dialogue, June 2020

 

Meet the Team Coordinators

 

Challenge 1

Martin Reguli is a senior analyst at the F. A. Hayek Foundation, a leading free-market think tank, focusing primarily on the areas of economics, social policy and foreign affairs at the level of Slovak Republic and European Union. He is active in the consultations about the education policy as well as the digitalisation progress in the V4 region. He helped organise multiple projects and conferences, bringing together different actors from the area of business, academia and the public sector. Mr Reguli has direct experience with work in the legislative chamber and with the research projects in the areas of foreign policy. He regularly appears in the media and offers commentaries regarding the key public policy areas.

 

 

 Challenge 2

Máté Hajba is the director of the Free Market Foundation, which advocates economic freedom, civil rights and tolerance. He is also the vice president of Civic Platform which runs anti-racist campaigns and promotes democratic values. He is interested in the relationship between the state and the individual and in the concept and history of liberty. He writes for international and national press and blogs on issues such as tolerance, international relations and the digital economy. To spread the concept of individualism, liberty, tolerance and free market, he co-founded a youth organization named Eötvös Club.

 

 

Challenge 3

Vytautas Žukauskas is Vice President of the Lithuanian Free Market Institute. He holds a Master’s degree in economics from Vilnius University and is currently in the final stages of his doctoral studies at the ISM University of Management and Economics in Vilnius, Lithuania and the University of Angers, France. His doctoral dissertation is in the area of monetary policy and financial markets. His other areas of research include shadow economy, competitiveness, sharing economy.

 

 

Challenge 4

Marek Tatala is Vice President and Economist at the Civil Development Forum (FOR Foundation) in Warsaw, Poland – a think tank founded by Professor Leszek Balcerowicz. He received his BSc in Economics and Politics from the University of Bristol in England and MA in Economics from the Warsaw School of Economics in Poland. He completed the CPPR-ACE Winter School in Public Policy Research Methods in India and the Think Tank MBA program organized by the Atlas Network. He is the graduate of the Atlas Leadership Academy and alumni of the Advancing Democracy program organized by FNF and the American Jewish Committee. His research interests include rule of law, law and economics, political economy and regulations constraining various individual freedoms.