Next Exit: Third Country 

Brexit is on its way, but the exciting part comes later

 

 

The word Brexit has almost become a synonym. For the last almost three years it seemingly stood for all sorts of things: for tough and fruitless negotiations; for the waste of precious work time of politicians, officials and journalists; for parliamentary drama and political navel-gazing; and for ever new extensions with uncertain outcomes. Now, however, the word will return to describe what it originally meant: the United Kingdom is leaving the European Union. After more than 47 years, its membership in the institutions of the European Community ended. Continue reading

Breaking the Glass Ceiling: Women in Politics 

+ Launch of the Women in Political Parties Inclusivity Index & Handbook

Brought to you by FNF Europe & Liberal International

 

REGISTER NOW
Kindly register for this event by 02. February at https://forms.gle/SQ2MW9ZHtv2VsCeTA *

PROGRAMME
18.30 Registration & Light Dinner
19.00 Welcome by Thomas Ilka
Regional Director, Friedrich Naumann Foundation Europe

Keynote Speech: Katalin Cseh (tbc)
Vice President, Renew Europe

Launch: Women in Political Parties
Inclusivity Index & Handbook

Astrid Thors
Chairperson, LI Human Rights Committee

19.30 Panel Discussion

Mu Sochua
Vice President, Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP)

Manon Deshayes
Junior Policy & Campaigns Officer,
European Women’s Lobby

Karen Melchior (tbc)
MEP (Radikale Venstre), Renew Europe

Antoaneta Asenova
Policy Officer, LYMEC
Accredited Parliament Assistant, European Parliament

Moderator: Astrid Thors

ABOUT THE EVENT
Even though women and men have the same legal right to take part in politics, women are still less likely to get involved in political parties and stand for office today. The Liberal International Women in Political Parties inclusivity index and handbook aims to increase the participation of women in political party structures and remove hurdles for them to do so, by gathering best practices from all over the world.

Join us in a discussion with political and civil society representatives and activists from Europe and beyond!

 

 

*Please note that you will be forwarded to a Google Drive sheet. 
Should you wish to register with us directly, please send an email to register.brussels@fnst.org. 
Photographs will be taken at the event for use on the FNF website, social media, in the press, FNF marketing materials, and other publications. By entering this event, you consent to FNF photographing and using your image and likeness

Killing of Soleimani: Not in the Name of Europe

What the killing of the Iranian General Soleimani means from a European perspective

The targeted killing of the Iranian General Qasem Soleimani is highly questionable under international law and strategically counterproductive. Negative consequences for the security of Europe and the cohesion within NATO are imminent.

From a European perspective, the American attack on the Iranian top military officer Qasem Soleimani and the accelerated escalation of the conflict between the USA and Iran that accompanied it, came completely unexpected. Continue reading

Orbán’s Move Towards Putin 

For the seventh time since the beginning of the Ukraine crisis, Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orbán has met with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

 

 

Hungary’s national conservative Prime Minister Viktor Orbán is one of the most vocal critics of Western sanctions against Russia. The relationship between the two countries has a strong economic foundation, especially in the form of a gas supply contract. On the 30th of October Hungary and Russia signed several agreements on social security, sport and the economy during a visit by Russian President Vladimir Putin to Budapest. According to Hungarian Foreign Minister Péter Szijjártó, the consultations with Moscow did not jeopardise Hungary’s loyalty to its NATO and EU partners. How is the EU dealing with these split tendencies? Continue reading

Why Brexit Will Not Happen and How the EP Might Help 

As seen on The Parliament Magazine 19th October

 

As the results of the UK’s 2016 referendum came in, my strong sense was – and remains – that Brexit will not happen. To confirm such a sentiment in a week in which Boris Johnson may triumph at the European Council might appear to invite ridicule. Yet the fundamentals remain unchanged. Continue reading