Brussels’ perceived over-regulation: the concept of gold-plating helps finding the culprit

Voting
Source: flickr.com/photos/european_parliament

“Brussels” has become a buzzword closely associated with over-regulation and the EU Commission is often perceived as the main culprit. However, the stereotype that some 30+ thousand EU officials are producing regulation after regulation to burden business and entrepreneurs is misleading. The fact is that significant over-regulation happens when European law is transposed into national law. Continue reading

Is a nanny state the price to pay for a zero risk world?

From left to right: Stephen Russell, Maija Laurila, Jacob Mchangama and Holger Krahmer MEP
From left to right: Stephen Russell, Maija Laurila, Jacob Mchangama and Holger Krahmer MEP

Last October the President of the European Commission published an article in the British newspaper The Telegraph in which he criticized the unnecessary regulation by the EU. In his article Barroso called upon a Europe that is “big on big things and smaller on smaller things”. Even if there is no direct link between low participation rates in European elections or growing protest vote for populist parties, the EU is too often perceived as a bureaucratic machine aiming at regulating every aspect of citizens’ lives. To discuss if this perception is true, we debated the regulation of products and behaviors of citizens by the EU and its member states. Continue reading